Usta rankings explain scoring rules for tennis

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Usta rankings explain scoring rules for tennis

Usta rankings

Usta rankings

Usta rankings counting points in tennis may seem complicated at first glance. A scoring system not used in any other sport is used here. All you need to do is take a moment to learn about it, so that it becomes completely understandable and obvious.
The basis for scoring points in tennis is a winning ball. The player who first scores four points wins the so-called game (with the proviso that he must have at least two points above the opponent). Games won make up the set. In the past, when light boards and other technical facilities were not available, points in tennis were marked on the watch face. Each won ball moved the hands 15 minutes. This is where the point naming method used today is. For simplicity, only one change was introduced: former 45 was replaced by 40. To better understand the current way of calculating points, I will use a simple example (in the following scenario we assume that only one player scores points):
First ball won: 15-0
Second ball win: 30-0
Third ball win: 40-0
Fourth ball won: gem
Now consider the example of a more fierce gem. Both players score points. At some point we have a result of 40:30. When a player who has 30 wins another ball on the lightboard we will see a result of 40:40 (so-called deuce). In this case, the player who wins two points in a row will win the game. The first point scored is called an advantage, the second ensures that the game is won. When the player who has the advantage loses the next ball, the result returns to balance.
The player who wins first two wins first wins the tennis match. There are exceptions to this rule. Usta rankings the Grand Slam men’s tournaments, Davis Cup and some of the Masters series are played until one player wins three sets. To win a set a player must win six games (and must have an advantage of at least two games over the opponent). The best way to understand this is by example:
6: 0 – one player has won six games. He won the set. The status of the match at the moment is 1: 0.
6: 4 – similar to the previous set. Seta was won by a player with six games on his account. The match status is 2: 0.
6: 5 – does not give the set a win because there is no advantage of two games. The set continues until one player gets a two-game advantage.
7: 5 – continuation of the previous example. The player who had 6 games won the next one and thus gained the advantage of two games as a result by winning the set and the whole match 3: 0.
Usta rankings the principle of the advantage of two games with an equal level of players can give very high results of 10: 8 and 21:19. Therefore, to shorten tennis matches, the tie-break principle was introduced in the 1970s.
To present this principle I will use a simple example:
Imagine an extremely fierce match in which two players of similar level faced each other. The rivals are in very high shape and none are going to let go because the game is at a high rate. The current set result is 6: 6 – each player has won six games. In such a situation, the tie-break mentioned above is played, which is the decisive gem. Points in the tie – break are calculated in the simplest possible way – 1, 2, 3 … The player who is the first to win
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